Posted in Health, Information

Pain Meds For Dogs

One  of the most common questions I hear is what can I give my dog for pain.

First I want to say dogs have extremely high pain tolerance.

Second before giving your dog any pain medication you need to identify why your dog is in pain.

The only human pain medication you can give a dog is Aspirin.

Start off with 5 milligrams of aspirin per pound of dog. If your dog still shows signs of high pain you can up the dosage to 10 milligrams per pound of dog. 1 dosage ever 12 hours. DO NOT overdose your dog, you will kill your dogs liver!!!

Now when giving your dog aspirin, you don’t want to give it to them for a long period of time. I give my dogs aspirin for about 2 days then a few days off then if they still need it I will give them a few more dosages. If your dog is still hurting after 7 days it is seriously time to consult a Vet.

I am not one to take my dogs to the vet over every little problem. I try to take care of my dogs at home. The vet as we all know is very expensive, and it is a several hour drive to a good vet. If you need vet advice several vets do vlog posts on YouTube that you can check out to help you. DO NOT run straight to Facebook and ask for advice, you will get several people thinking they know everything and wanting to add their two cents.

Posted in Health, Information

Dental Month

As I stated in an earlier post February is Dental month for our pets. Most vet offices give a discount on dental procedures for the month of February so take advantage of it if your pup needs it.

It can be really challenging to know when your dog has dental issues – after all, dogs are genetically wired to eat despite almost any degree of discomfort. Add to that the fact that most pet parents don’t know what dental disease in their dogs really looks like, and it can be a recipe for disaster in terms of untreated dental disease. Read on to learn the signs and symptoms of dental disease in dogs.

His breath smells like an open sewer

This one is pretty easy. I mean, there’s dog breath, and then there’s dog breath. And you know when your dog’s breath has gone above and beyond the commonly-accepted standard for how dog’s breath normally smells, which is a bit stinky but not terribly so.

It’s probably actually more correct to say that when your dog’s breath smells like an open sewer, he has needed a dental cleaning and examination for quite some time. Oftentimes, when you smell that really rotten smell coming from your dog, it’s actually the bacteria and infection that you’re smelling. Abscesses show up at the tips of the roots, and it happens because the presence of plaque and tartar on the teeth causes the attachment between the gums and the teeth that sit in them to begin to loosen. And this creates something of a freeway between the mouth (nasty and filled with bacteria on a good day) and the tooth root (typically a squeaky clean, if not completely sterile, place), which sets up a fantastic environment for an infection. And this infection leads to pain and bone decay and a host of other complications.

Two take away points: once the gum pulls away from the tooth, it’s almost impossible to get it to reattach; and once there is an abscess present, there is very little that can be done except to surgically remove the tooth. The moral of the story: don’t let this happen to your dog.

Worn or Broken Teeth

Teeth wear gradually – it happens in people, for sure, but the rate is drastically accelerated in species that make it their business to chew up every stick and rock in the tri-state area (Pro-tip: don’t let your dog chew on sticks and rocks).

The teeth are designed to withstand some wear. That’s what the “crown” is for – it’s the enamel on the top of the tooth that forms the biting or chewing surface. Once the enamel on the crown wears down, the sensitive pulp cavity is exposed, causing not only pain but also, again, a pathway for mouth bacteria to travel to the tip of the root and form an abscess.

When Mr. Squirrel is cast aside

Dental pain can be so subtle in dogs, their owners are often shocked when they learn the ugly truth of the state of their teeth. Many times the dog is continuing to eat just fine – even hard kibble – but they’ll start to be less interested in playing with a favorite chew toy, and that’s likely a sign that their teeth are hurting.

Reluctance to accept a chewy treat, less interest in play that involves grasping objects with the mouth, and even favoring one side of the mouth when eating are all signs that you should watch for.

When he seems to just sloooooooow down

While you shouldn’t assume your older dog’s lethargy is related to dental disease, if he is slowing down, he does have dental disease, your veterinarian can’t find another cause, and routine testing (blood work, chest x-rays) are normal, get his teeth cleaned. A thorough cleaning and exam including x-rays of all of the teeth can reveal significant disease, and very possibly the source of all of his problems.

I once had a botched root canal, and I can tell you that when the local anesthetic subsided, I experienced intense and debilitating pain. So, it makes complete sense to me that untreated dental disease can cause enough pain to slow your dog down considerably. Again – be sure to look for other problems, but if everything else checks out, address the dental disease. You will likely be surprised in the improvement in your dog’s overall attitude.

When your veterinarian tells you

It’s not easy to get a thorough look in your dog’s mouth, but your veterinarian is trained to do it. Most dogs need to have their teeth cleaned by age 3, and yearly after that. Veterinarians are trained to recognize subtle signs of dental disease, such as red gums, gum recession, and worn and fractured teeth. So be sure to keep your dog’s yearly or semi-annual appointment with his veterinarian, and heed the advice you are given.

 

Well I hope you all learned something from this post and I hope you all keep a close eye on your pups dental heath. Especially this month when you might be able to save a couple bucks on that expensive vet bill.

If you ever have any questions feel free to email me at germanshepherddogs@doglover.com

Posted in Health, Information

Ear Mites

WARNING: Graphic pictures of infected ears at bottom of post.

As promised in my post Ear Infection here is the post on ear mites. Now there is not much difference in the appearance of an Ear Infection and Ear mites. Ear mites are extremely small and resemble coffee grounds as an ear infection is just red-brown yeast/bacteria infection.

Please read my post Ear Infection because signs and symptoms are the same.

Ear mites are popular in puppies, cats, rabbits, and areas with several dogs.

The treatment for simple ear mites is no different then just an Ear Infection. You clean the ear and you use medicine to kill the mites, mites eggs, and the infection they have spread. Now the difference with mites is it is extremely likely that the mites could have transferred a different infection or disease to your dog as well as the ear infection. Therefore if you see the coffee ground looking little buggers in your babies ear, take them to a vet to ensure nothing else has been transferred. Now when you’re at the vet they will most likely prescribe the medicine to clean up the infection and kill the mites. Here are some more medicines that you can purchase. As stated in my post Ear Infection this is my favorite ear infection, mite killing medicine.

The other difference with ear mites is you have won your self an entire through house cleaning. Just like fleas ear mites can “get off” one dog, sit on the floor for a bit and be “picked up” by another dog. Granted ear mites can not live long without a “host” but they can still be hiding anywhere. So you get to clean your floors really well. Along with under your bed, the couch, chairs, tables, in your dogs crate, in their dog bed, around their food and water bowls, the bathroom, well pretty much everywhere. Unlike fleas a through house cleaning should do the trick because mites do not live long off of the host.

 

I hope you all learned something from this post and I hope your fur babies are ok. If you have any questions feel free to email me at germanshepheddogs@doglover.com

Posted in Health, Information

Ear Infection

Do you think your dog has an ear infection??

There are two different types of ear infections, in most adult dogs it is a yeast and bacteria infection (what this post is about) in puppies and younger dogs it is more likely to be ear mites (I will be doing a post on this soon).

Does your dogs ear have a red-ish brown-ish color ear wax covering the inside of the ear??

Does your dogs ear smell funny?? (dogs ears shouldn’t smell)

Is your dog favoring one ear, holding it off to the side??

Is your dog itching his ear a lot??

Is your dog crying sometimes when he itches his ear??

If you answered yes to these then your dog most likely has a yeast/bacteria ear infection. Now I am not a vet but I have had a few dogs with ear infections so I take matters into my own hands.

First, clean the ear. Make a solution of 50% water 50% hydrogen peroxide (yes the brown bottle that bubbles on your cuts). Make sure it is just over room temperature. Pour a little bit of the solution in your dogs ear then place a cotton ball or two into the ear as well. Massage the base of the ear for as long as your dog will let you. (normally about 60-90 seconds. Remove the cotton ball and let them shake. Is the cotton ball red-ish brown?? Most likely. Place another cotton ball in their ear and massage the ear for about 30-60 seconds. Repeat as necessary to get a clean cotton ball or until your pup has had enough.

Now that the ear is mostly clean it is time to put in the medicine. I LOVE LOVE LOVE EcoEars it is natural and extremely effective. I recently used this for my GSD and it surprised me. My first dog that had an ear infection I rushed my dog to the vet like a good mom and got a $100 vet bill and weird yellow/cream colored medicine to put in his ears. It did the job in 10 days it was gone and my pup was happy. EcoEars stopped the smell and the pain for my dog in about 3-4 days. After I put it in his ears and massaged it chunks of yeast and bacteria (the red/brown stuff) would come flying out when he would shake his head. I could tell my boy was feeling much better! It has been 5 days, his ear is standing up like normal instead of kind of off to the side, he is not in pain when he scratches his ear now. I am still going to treat for the full 7-10 days to ensure the infection is gone; because this is all natural it will not harm your dog if you keep treating with no infection. It will then just become an ear cleaner. It is just like when we take antibiotics and they tell us to take ALL the medicine even if we are feeling better after the first 4 days.

With all that being said I did not take this dog with an ear infection to the vet because as stated earlier, to get to a vet for me is a 3 hour drive there and back and 1 tank of gas. Now if it was an emergency and something I cant take care of my self then yes I would make the drive for the safety of my dog.

I hope this has helped yall and I hope you love this product as much as I do. If you ever have questions feel free to email me anytime at germanshepherddogs@doglover.com

Posted in Health, Homemade, Information

Home Remedy

If your like me you hate taking your dog to the vet, heck I hate going to the doctor. For me it is a 3 hour drive there and a 3 hour drive home to a good AKC vet so I only go when it is needed. I do all of my own home remedies and deworm by my self and take care of ear infections and all that.

Below is a few home remedies that will help keep your dog in less pain until you can get to a vet. Also check out these other post. Dry Skin CPR for dogs Basic First Aid For Pets In Case of Emergency Heat Stroke & Hyperthermia Emergency Vet Advice Cuts and Scrapes Cancer in dogs Dog safe human Medication

 

home-remedy

 

I hope this helps some of yall that are in the same position I am. I have several more home remedies that I love so feel free to email me anytime at germanshepherddogs@doglover.com

Posted in Health, Seasonal

Pumpkin

Everyone knows that pumpkin is great for our dogs, but do you know how or why it is good for your dogs???

Below is a picture that explains how pumpkin is good for our dogs. I am sure this is not all of the uses for pumpkin but it is a start, as I find more uses for pumpkin I will add them. I hope this helps.

pumpkin

I hope this helps some of you that have had questions about pumpkin. If you have questions feel free to email me germanshepherddogs@doglover.com

Posted in Health, Seasonal

Dry Skin

Its that time of year again, the cold weather, chapped nose, dry skin, itching and the scratching. Well below is a few great ways to help sooth the skin and to not itch so much.

Coconut Oil on top of your dogs food this time of year is great! Check out my other post  Coconut Oil for more information on that.

Vinegar uses for pets also has some information about this as well.

Below is a very good itch spray that you make right at home to help your dog as well.

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There are several more I just can’t think of them right now, I will add them as I remember them so check back often. If you have a recipe that you like feel free to post it in the comments or email it to me so I can add it.

I hope this helps feel free to email me anytime. Germanshepherddogs@doglover.com