Posted in Health, Traveling

Kennel Cough

Ok, enough creepy crawler worms for now. Lets talk about something that is not as serious as most of those worms. Here is all the information that I have found on Kennel Cough, I will add more as I find it.

This Holiday season if you are not traveling with your pet and you are leaving them at a kennel it would be a great idea to use some of these preventative measures to help protect your pup from getting Kennel Cough.

If your dog is hacking away or constantly making noises that make it sound like he’s chocking or trying to cough something up (you know like your husband does), he may have a case of Kennel Cough, or canine infectious tracheobronchitis. Although kennel cough can sound terrible, most of the time it is not a serious condition, and most dogs will recover without treatment.

Just as human colds may be caused by many different viruses, kennel cough itself can have multiple causes. One of the most common culprits is a bacterium called Bordetella bronchiseptica m– which is why kennel cough is often called Bordetella. Most dogs that become infected with Bordetella are infected with a virus at the same time. These viruses, which are known to make dogs more susceptible to contracting Bordetella infection, include canine adenovirus, canine distemper virus, canine herpes virus, parainfluenza virus and canine reovirus.

Dogs “catch” kennel cough when they inhale bacteria or virus particles into their respiratory tract (just like we do). This tract is normally lined with a coating of mucus that traps infectious particles (just like our nose), but there are a number of factors that can weaken this protection and make dogs prone to kennel cough infection, which results in inflammation of the larynx (voice box) and trachea (windpipe). (Sound familiar?? it is literally a cold in dogs; just like with us humans, sometimes we can get over a cold without medicine and sometimes we can’t).

Dogs can “catch” kennel cough from the following factors (just like we can):

  • Exposure to crowded and/or poorly ventilated conditions, such as are found in many kennels and shelters
  • Cold temperatures
  • Exposure to dust or cigarette smoke
  • Travel-induced stress

Ok enough chit-chatting here is what you really came here to find out. Symptoms, Prevention and Treatment.

Symptoms of Kennel Cough

The classic symptom of kennel cough is a persistent, forceful cough. It often sounds like a goose honk. This is distinct from a cough-like sound made by some dogs, especially little ones, which is called a reverse sneeze. Reverse sneezes can be normal in certain dogs and breeds, and usually only indicates the presence of post-nasal drip or a slight irritation of the throat.

Some dogs with kennel cough may show other symptoms of illness, including sneezing, a runny nose, or eye discharge (eye boogers).

If your dog has kennel cough, he probably will not lose his appetite or have a decreased energy level.

Treating and Preventing Kennel Cough

Kennel cough is contagious. If you think your dog might have the condition, you should keep him away from other animals and contact your veterinarian.

Treating and Preventing Kennel Cough continued…

Although most cases of kennel cough will resolve without treatment, medications may speed recovery or minimize symptoms during the course of infection.  These include antibiotics that target Bordetella bacteria and cough medicines.

You may also find that keeping your dog in a well-humidified area and using a harness instead of a collar, especially for dogs that strain against a leash, will minimize the coughing.

Most dogs with kennel cough recover completely within three weeks, though it can take up to six weeks in older dogs or those with other medical conditions. Because serious, ongoing kennel cough infection can lead to pneumonia, be sure to follow up with your veterinarian if your dog doesn’t improve within the expected amount of time. Also, if your dog at any time has symptoms of rapid breathing, not eating, or listlessness, contact your vet right away, as these could be signs of more serious conditions.

There are three forms of vaccine for kennel cough: one that is injected, one that is delivered as a nasal mist, and one that can be given by mouth. Although these vaccines may help, they do not guarantee protection against kennel cough or infectious tracheobronchitis because it can be caused by so many different kinds of bacteria and viruses. Also, it is important to realize that neither form of the kennel cough vaccination will treat active infections.

As you know from reading my other posts I normally have links to amazon.com for what I like to use for the topic we are talking about. Here is an entire list of great medicines to help treat and to help prevent kennel cough. I personally like the HomeoPet brand because it is all natural but so are some of the others in this list. I hope this helps you all!!

Well I know that is a lot of reading but I hope you learned something!! As always if you ever have any questions feel free to email me at Germanshepherddogs@doglover.com

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Author:

I am a down home Country Woman, and I love to train dogs, and horses. I have produced my own training curriculum through my years. The following blog posts are all my beliefs and how I like to train. If you ever have questions or comments that you would like to email me directly please feel free to email me at germanshepherddogs@doglover.com

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