Posted in Health, Hygiene

Tapeworms

To continue our talk of worms our topic today is Tapeworms. Tape worms in dogs are not as common as the other worms that we have been talking about like HeartWorms Part 1, Round Worms, and Hook Worms but they can still happen and below is what you need to know.

Tapeworms in dogs is the same tapeworm that would infect us humans, it can also infect cats, and really any other living being out there. Without me rambling on here is the down and dirty of what you need to know about tapeworms.

Tapeworms are long, flat worms that attach themselves to your dog’s intestines. A tapeworm body consists of multiple parts, or segments, each with its own reproductive organs.

Tapeworm infections are usually diagnosed by finding pieces of the tapeworm they appear as small white worms that may look like grains of rice or seeds—on the rear end of your dog, in your dog’s feces, or where your dog lives and sleeps.

Affects of Tapeworms to my dog

Dogs with tapeworm infections usually are not sick and do not lose weight from the worms. Contrary to popular belief, dogs that “scoot” on their rear ends are generally doing it for reasons other than having tapeworms, such as blocked or irritated anal sacs (pouches located in your dog’s rear end) or other skin inflammation of the rear.

How do I prevent my dog from getting tapeworms?

Try to keep your dog from coming in contact with intermediate hosts that contain tapeworm larvae. Fleas, Mice, and other rodents are well know for carrying Tapeworms.  Because fleas are an intermediate host for the most common kind of tapeworm, consistent, safe, and effective flea control is an essential prevention measure.

If you think your dog is infected with tapeworms, call your veterinarian for an appointment to get an accurate diagnosis and safe, effective treatment options.

To prevent Taenia and Dipylidium tapeworm infections in dogs, administer a monthly heartworm preventive that contains a drug specific for tapeworm infections.

Here is a link to amazon of Tapeworm treatments for dogs.

 

Well like always I hope you learned something from the above article.

If you ever have any questions feel free to email me at Germanshepherdogs@doglover.com

 

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Author:

I am a down home Country Woman, and I love to train dogs, and horses. I have produced my own training curriculum through my years. The following blog posts are all my beliefs and how I like to train. If you ever have questions or comments that you would like to email me directly please feel free to email me at germanshepherddogs@doglover.com

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